Running BBC BASIC on a home-built computer

Sunday, 7th September 2008

This computer needs a name - I'd welcome any suggestions!

I have built a circuit on another piece of stripboard that will handle memory, clock signal generation and the Z80 itself.

A few posts ago I was wondering about how I'd partition memory. To date I've been using a very simple circuit where the lower 32KB of addressable memory is mapped to ROM and the upper 32KB is mapped to RAM. As my ROM chip is 128KB and I have two 32KB RAM chips, this seems a bit wasteful.

The memory layout I'm now using is quite simple: the upper 32KB is still mapped to RAM. However, only the first 16KB is mapped to ROM, and the three most significant bits of the ROM chip's address lines are connected to a device on the I/O board so that one of its eight 16KB "pages" can be swapped in. The next 16KB will be mapped to RAM, and the most significant bit of the RAM chip's address is connected to the same device on the I/O board so one of its two 16KB "pages" can be swapped in.


For more information, see the Wikipedia article on bank switching. There is a potential problem here; the Z80 uses particular fixed addresses for certain operations. The three most obvious ones are $0000 (jumped to on reset), $0038 (address of maskable interrupt handler) and $0066 (address of non-maskable interrupt handler). As which 16KB bank switched in at power-on is effectively random, the easy way around this problem is to ensure that the first 256 bytes or so of every ROM page has the same code assembled on it. This means that whichever page is swapped in on boot doesn't matter, as the same common boot code is available on each page.

The assembled memory board looks like this:

I have only attached one of the 32KB RAM chips. The wiring was becoming a bit of a nightmare (I think I'll need to solder to the track side of the stripboard to fit in that other RAM chip) so for the moment the system can only access the fixed 32KB RAM. I haven't yet added the device on the I/O board to handle bank switching, so for the moment the ROM is permanently configured to access the first 16KB page by pulling the its three externally controllable address lines low.

That said, this machine does genuinely run BBC BASIC (the last system only ran a mockup with a dummy header at the top of the screen). I've done quite a bit of work on the OS in the emulator and it works pretty well there, and with a minor adjustment to cram it onto a single 16KB page it works well on hardware too.

The row of chips along the bottom of the memory board are responsible for generating the clock signals that drive the computer. If this looks needlessly complex, that's because it can run at either 10MHz or 2MHz and generates the E signal for LCD access. The CPU needs to drop to 2MHz when accessing the LCD (the LCD driver can't keep up, otherwise) so I'll probably end up connecting the input for this 2MHz/10MHz switch to the LCD chip enable pins so that normally the system runs at 10MHz but drops to 2MHz when accessing the LCD. Allowing the user to drop to 2MHz to save power is an appealing idea, however...

FirstPreviousNextLast RSSSearchBrowse by dateIndexTags